Westworld’s Jeffrey Wright Discusses This Season’s Multiple Timelines

Bernard Westworld

One of the most apparent realizations to come out of Westworld‘s season two premiere is that we will, once again, be jumping back and forth between multiple timelines. The earlier timeline, at least as of now, has been established as taking place directly after Dolores’s (Evan Rachel Wood) revolution, and the second timeline is taking place two weeks later as Karl Strand (Gustaf Skarsgård) and his team proceed with their investigation into the incident. There was also a third timeline established very briefly during the scene involving Dolores and Arnold (Jeffrey Wright), which takes place years in the past, and we know that soon we’ll also be diving into a timeline involving Logan (Ben Barnes) and Young William (Jimmi Simpson).

Wright recently sat down with Esquire to discuss these multiple timelines, and how his character’s struggle to comprehend the events taking place in each seem to mirror the viewer’s journey to understand everything that has and will take place over the season.


“He’s in some ways debilitated over more than one timeline. It could be that there are different ailments and different solutions. His difficulties in the aftermath of Dolores’s revolution by taking out Ford [Anthony Hopkins] is slightly different than his state waking up on the beach when he meets the Delos first responder team. He’s having trouble on more than one timeline. In some ways, he may represent all of us as we proceed through the season.”

That being said, Wright does admit that there were some glaring hints dropped all the way back in the pilot episode, which could very well be used to make sense of the show’s current narrative trajectory. “I discovered that there are some flashing neon breadcrumbs that had been invisible to my eye in the the first reading, performing, and watching of the episode,” says the actor. “In fact, there’s a scene, which I think may be the first scene that we shot for the pilot, that speaks to the overarching scene of Season Two. And I looked at that and was like, These clever bastards.”

Well, it looks like I will definitely be going back and rewatching the pilot before the next episode…

Wright also offered up some advice to the Westworld fandom, particularly those who theorize and try to piece together the entire narrative of the season before it takes place. “I think, as an audience, it’s best to just surrender to it and enjoy the trip. At the end of this second season, the justification for the use of these fractured mirror reflections will be clear.”

Whatever the justification turns out to be, at this point it seems that Bernard is serving as the connecting thread between the multiple timelines. As his understanding of each becomes more and more clear, hopefully our comprehension continues to improve as well.

What do you think of Wright’s insight into his character’s involvment within multiple timelines? Let us know!

5 responses to “Westworld’s Jeffrey Wright Discusses This Season’s Multiple Timelines”

  1. “I think, as an audience, it’s best to just surrender to it and enjoy the trip. At the end of this second season, the justification for the use of these fractured mirror reflections will be clear.”
    The best advice there is. I have been slaving over what about and if’s and this might be’s……and I may still post my thoughts along the way, but, I really want to sit back and ENJOY what is happening on the screen and let my mind explode like reveries!

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  2. “In fact, there’s a scene, which I think may be the first scene that we shot for the pilot, that speaks to the overarching scene of Season Two. And I looked at that and was like, These clever bastards.”

    That will make me crazy! Presumably, the scene from the pilot is one that Wright was in so it involves Arnold/Bernard.

    And what is the “overarching scene of Season Two?” Bernard on the beach? Bernard with the drone hosts?

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  3. From what the actors and actresses have been saying… it seems this season is going to completely confuse us. It seems that they’re implying that we are going to think we know where the season is heading, and then at the end it is going to completely change and everything we thought we knew was wrong.

    I’m so fucking pumped.

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  4. mariamb,

    The pilot has so much symbolism in it, Wright could be talking about some of that. I remember rewatching and thinking, “Wow, there’s a ton of foreshadowing for the host revolt right here in the first episode.” And I’m sure there are a million other little Easter Eggs in there too, small throw-away lines that us viewers would just gloss over but really have a lot of meaning later down the road.

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  5. mariamb,

    Since this season’s overall title is “The Door”, I wonder if it relates to that somehow. The problem is that I’m not sure whether to be looking for a literal door or a figurative door.

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